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Descriptions: Abstract: P6437 Inpact of intravascular ultrasound guided coronary intervention using minimum dose of contrast on 1 year clinical outcomes in patients with severe chronic kidney disease -MINICON2 study- Authors: K. Sakai1, Y. Ikari1, 1Tokai University School of Medicine, Cardiology - Kanagawa - Japan, Citation: European Heart Journal ( 2017 ) 38 ( Supplement ), 1390-1391 Background: Contrast dye is well known to cause contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI)which results in poor clinical outcomes in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). It has been a reason for inappropriately low application of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) to CKD patients. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) guided PCI can reduce contrast dose dramatically. Objectives: To study impact of IVUS guided PCI using minimum contrast volume on 1 year clinical outcomes in patients with CKD. Methods: MINICON 2 is a prospective, single-arm multicenter study conducted in 14 institutions. The study patients have coronary artery disease requiring elective PCI comorbid with severe CKD as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)<30 ml/min/1.73 m2 or eGFR 30 - 44 ml/min/1.73 m2 with proteinuria. All the PCI was tried to perform using contrast volume less than eGFR. Results: A total of 100 patients were enrolled. Average age was 75±10 years, 75% were male and 56% were diabetic. Mean baseline eGFR was 29.5±8.3 ml/min/1.73 m2 and proteinuria was observed in 50%. IVUS-guided PCI was applied to all the cases. Median contrast volume was 22 [IQR 11 - 36] ml and 79% achieved less than eGFR value. The incidences of CI-AKI was 3%. One year cardiac death and induction of maintenance hemodialysis was 2% and 3%, respectively. In comparison with our prior MINICON1 study which was non-IVUS guided study is shown in Table. Conclusions: IVUS-guided PCI reduced contrast dose, CI-AKI and induction of hemodialysis at 1 year with similar reduction of cardiac death.     Abstract: P1572 Renal function is one of the determinant factors of subclinical coronary calcification. An intravascular ultrasound virtual histology study Authors: O. Sasaki1, T. Nishioka1, Y. Inoue1, K. Toyama1, A. Isshiki1, T. Ando1, T. Inokuchi1, R. Yamaguchi1, H. Ito1, N. Yoshimoto1, 1Saitama Medical Center, Saitama Medical University - Kawagoe - Japan, Topic(s): Cardiovascular risk Citation: European Heart Journal ( 2013 ) 34 ( Abstract Supplement ), 307-308 Background: Chronic kidney disease is considered one of the most important cardiovascular risks and the relation between coronary calcium and renal function has been reported. However, its relation in non-culprit lesion is not fully elucidated. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to clarify the relation between coronary calcium evaluated by VH-IVUS and renal function in non-culprit coronary lesions. Methods: Non-culprit coronary plaques of 341 patients (groupA, n=217 e-GFR =60: groupB, n=124 e-GFR<60) with ischemic heart disease were imaged by intravascular ultrasound. External elastic membrane CSA (EEM-CSA) and lumen CSA (lumen-CSA) were measured. Plaque burden, eccentricity index and Plaque + Media CSA (P+M CSA); (EEM-CSA)-(lumen CSA) were calculated. Plaque composition was classified into 4 categories, Fibrous (F), Fibro-fatty (FF), Dense calcium (DC) and Necrotic core (NC) using Virtual-Histology software. Results: There was no difference in plaque burden, EEM-CSA, P+M CSA, F% and NC% between 2 groups, however, FF% was significantly smaller (11.0±7.5 vs 13.2±7.9, p=0.01) and DC% was significantly larger (12.1±10.3 vs 9.6±8.3, p=0.02) in groupB than in groupA. Multivariate analysis showed that female (p=0.02) and e-GFR (p=0.01) were determinant factors of relative volume of dense calcium by VH-IVUS. Conclusions: In patients with CKD, non-culprit coronary plaques contained larger amount of dense calcium and less fibro-fatty tissue compared without CKD patients. Renal function is one of the determinant factors of subclinical coronary calcification in non-culprit coronary lesions.       Meet The New Antibiotic-Resistant ‘Hypervirulent’ Superbug Discovered In China zeropointnow Tue Sep 5, 2017 5:54pm EST 4 Comments To take your mind off nuclear war with North Korea and deadly hurricanes, let’s talk about other ways to cull the herd… Scientists in Hangzhou, China have discovered a new strain of antibiotic-resistant pneumonia which spreads incredibly fast, after a 2016 outbreak in a hospital ICU led to the deaths of five patients ranging in age from 53 to 73. In findings published in The Lancet, researchers conclude that the new superbug poses a “substantial threat to human health” due to the fact that it is “simultaneously hypervirulent, multidrug resistant, and highly transmissible A fatal outbreak of ST11 carbapenem-resistant hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Chinese hospital: a molecular epidemiological study Danxia Gu x Danxia Gu Search for articles by this author Affiliations Department of Clinical Laboratory Medicine, Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China Center for Cancer Biology and Innovative Therapeutics, Key Laboratory of Tumor Molecular Diagnosis and Individualized Medicine of Zhejiang Province, Clinical Research Institute, Zhejiang Provincial People's Hospital, Hangzhou, ChinaxSheng ChenSearch for articles by this author Affiliations Shenzhen Key Lab for Food Biological Safety Control, Food Safety and Technology Research Center, Hong Kong PolyU Shen Zhen Research Institute, Shenzhen, China State Key Lab of Chirosciences, Department of Applied Biology and Chemical Technology, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China Correspondence Dr Sheng Chen, State Key Lab of Chirosciences, Department of Applied Biology and Chemical Technology, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China    Report Inactivation of porcine endogenous retrovirus in pigs using CRISPR-Cas9 1.    Dong Niu1,2,*, 1.    ?‡Corresponding author. Email: luhan.yang@egenesisbio.com Science  22 Sep 2017: Vol. 357, Issue 6357, pp. 1303-1307 DOI: 10.1126/science.aan4187 Dong Niu eGenesis, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.College of Animal Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China. Find this author on Google ScholarFind this author on PubMedSearch for this author on this siteORCID record for Dong NiuHong-Jiang WeiState Key Laboratory for Conservation and Utilization of Bio-Resources in Yunnan, Yunnan Agricultural University, Kunming 650201, China.College of Animal Science and Technology, Yunnan Agricultural University, Kunming 650201, China. Find this author on Google ScholarFind this author on PubMedSearch for this author on this siteORCID record for Hong-Jiang WeiLin LinDepartment of Biomedicine, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. Find this author on Google ScholarFind this author on PubMedSearch for this author on this siteORCID record for Lin LinHaydy GeorgeeGenesis, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Find this author on Google ScholarFind this author on PubMedSearch for this author on this siteTao WangeGenesis, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Find this author on Google ScholarFind this author on PubMedSearch for this author on this siteORCID record for Tao WangI-Hsiu LeeeGenesis, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Find this author on Google ScholarFind this author on PubMedSearch for this author on this siteORCID record for I-Hsiu LeeHong-Ye ZhaoState Key Laboratory for Conservation and Utilization of Bio-Resources in Yunnan, Yunnan Agricultural University, Kunming 650201, China. Find this author on Google ScholarFind this author on PubMedSearch for this author on this siteORCID record for Hong-Ye ZhaoYong WangDepartment of Laboratory Animal Science, College of Basic Medical Sciences, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, 400038, China. Find this author on Google ScholarFind this author on PubMedSearch for this author on this siteYinan KaneGenesis, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Find this author on Google ScholarFind this author on PubMedSearch for this author on this siteEllen ShrockDepartment of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Find this author on Google ScholarFind this author on PubMedSearch for this author on this siteEmal LeshaeGenesis, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Find this author on Google ScholarFind this author on PubMedSearch for this author on this siteORCID record for Emal LeshaGang WangeGenesis, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Find this author on Google ScholarFind this author on PubMedSearch for this author on this siteORCID record for Gang WangYonglun LuoDepartment of Biomedicine, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. Find this author on Google ScholarFind this author on PubMedSearch for this author on this siteORCID record for Yonglun LuoYubo QingState Key Laboratory for Conservation and Utilization of Bio-Resources in Yunnan, Yunnan Agricultural University, Kunming 650201, China.College of Animal Science and Technology, Yunnan Agricultural University, Kunming 650201, China. Find this author on Google ScholarFind this author on PubMedSearch for this author on this siteORCID record for Yubo QingDeling JiaoState Key Laboratory for Conservation and Utilization of Bio-Resources in Yunnan, Yunnan Agricultural University, Kunming 650201, China.College of Animal Science and Technology, Yunnan Agricultural University, Kunming 650201, China. Find this author on Google ScholarFind this author on PubMedSearch for this author on this siteORCID record for Deling JiaoHeng ZhaoState Key Laboratory for Conservation and Utilization of Bio-Resources in Yunnan, Yunnan Agricultural University, Kunming 650201, China.College of Animal Science and Technology, Yunnan Agricultural University, Kunming 650201, China. Find this author on Google ScholarFind this author on PubMedSearch for this author on this siteORCID record for Heng ZhaoXiaoyang ZhouDepartment of Laboratory Animal Science, College of Basic Medical Sciences, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, 400038, China. Find this author on Google ScholarFind this author on PubMedSearch for this author on this siteShouqi WangResearch Institute of Shenzhen Jinxinnong Technology, Shenzhen 518106, China. Find this author on Google ScholarFind this author on PubMedSearch for this author on this siteORCID record for Shouqi WangHong WeiDepartment of Laboratory Animal Science, College of Basic Medical Sciences, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, 400038, China. Find this author on Google ScholarFind this author on PubMedSearch for this author on this siteMarc GüelleGenesis, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Find this author on Google ScholarFind this author on PubMedSearch for this author on this siteORCID record for Marc GüellGeorge M. ChurcheGenesis, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. Find this author on Google ScholarFind this author on PubMedSearch for this author on this siteORCID record for George M. ChurchLuhan YangeGenesis, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Find this author on Google ScholarFind this author on PubMedSearch for this author on this siteORCID record for Luhan Yang Taking the PERVs out of pigs With the severe shortage of organs needed for transplants, xenotransplantation (transplantation of nonhuman organs to humans) offers an alternative source. Some pig organs have similar size and function to those of humans. The challenge is that the pig genome harbors porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) that can potentially pass to humans with possibly damaging consequences. Niu et al. generated pigs in which all copies of PERVs were inactivated by CRISPR-Cas9 genome engineering (see the Perspective by Denner). Not only does this work provide insights into PERV activity, but it also opens the door to a safer source of organs and tissues for pig-to-human xenotransplantation. Science, this issue p. 1303; see also p. 1238 Abstract Xenotransplantation is a promising strategy to alleviate the shortage of organs for human transplantation. In addition to the concerns about pig-to-human immunological compatibility, the risk of cross-species transmission of porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) has impeded the clinical application of this approach. We previously demonstrated the feasibility of inactivating PERV activity in an immortalized pig cell line. We now confirm that PERVs infect human cells, and we observe the horizontal transfer of PERVs among human cells. Using CRISPR-Cas9, we inactivated all of the PERVs in a porcine primary cell line and generated PERV-inactivated pigs via somatic cell nuclear transfer. Our study highlights the value of PERV inactivation to prevent cross-species viral transmission and demonstrates the successful production of PERV-inactivated animals to address the safety concern in clinical xenotransplantation.         Abstract: P6122 Impact of end-stage kidney disease on left and right ventricular mechanics: does kidney transplantation reverse the abnormalities? Authors: B. Xu1, S. Harb1, N. Hawwa2, W. Tang2, G. Nakhoul3, R. Fatica3, Z. Popovic1, W. Jaber1, 1Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Section of Cardiovascular Imaging, Heart and Vascular Institute - Cleveland - United States of America, 2Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Heart and Vascular Institute - Cleveland - United States of America, 3Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Department of Nephrology - Cleveland - United States of America, Topic(s): Echocardiography - Ventricular and atrial function Citation: European Heart Journal ( 2017 ) 38 ( Supplement ), 1294 Background: End-stage kidney disease (ESKD) has a negative impact on left ventricular (LV) remodeling. Reduced LV global longitudinal strain (GLS) has been associated with increased mortality in hemodialysis patients. The impact of kidney transplantation on LV and RV mechanics is unknown. Purpose: To investigate LV and RV mechanics prior to kidney transplantation, and to examine whether these parameters change significantly post kidney transplantation. Methods: We assessed 72 consecutive patients who underwent kidney transplantation between April 2010 and November 2013 at our center, and who also had baseline and post kidney transplantation echocardiograms. LV GLS, RV GLS and RV free wall strain were measured pre and post kidney transplantation, using velocity vector imaging Results: The mean patient age was 54±11 years (40% female). ESKD etiologies included: hypertension (22%), diabetes mellitus (22%), glomerulonephritis (22%), polycystic kidney disease (5%), and miscellaneous causes (29%). The median duration of follow-up post kidney transplantation was 338 days (Table). The mean baseline LV wall thicknesses were: 13.6±2.9 mm (septum); 12.0±2.6 mm (posterior wall). The mean baseline LV mass indexed to body surface area was 128.5 45.9 grams/m2. There was no significant change in the mean LV ejection fraction post kidney transplantation (pre: 56±8.2%; post: 58±11%; mean difference: 1.7±12%, p=0.25). There were fewer patients with LV and RV systolic dysfunction post kidney transplantation (LV: 28% (20 patients) to 18% (13 patients); RV: 24% (17 patients) to 11% (8 patients)). The mean LV GLS, RV GLS and RV free wall strain were all abnormally reduced prior to kidney transplantation (-13.2±3.9%, -15.7±6.0%, -17.3±8.2%, respectively). Kidney transplantation did not significantly change the LV and RV strain parameters (Figure). Conclusions: Strain parameters (LV GLS, RV GLS, RV free wall strain) were all abnormally reduced prior to kidney transplantation. Kidney transplantation did not reverse abnormal LV and RV mechanics at a mean follow-up duration of 338 days. Table 1. Echocardiographic variables of the study cohort Time between baseline echocardiogram and transplantation (days) 190 (83–331) Time between transplantation and follow-up echocardiogram (days) 338 (163–437) LV GLS (%) Baseline -13.2±3.9 Post transplantation -13.2±3.4 Mean difference 0.05±4.4, p=0.93 RV GLS (%) Baseline -15.7±6.0 Post transplantation -15.7±4.8 Mean difference -0.43±5.9, p=0.55 RV free wall strain (%) Baseline -17.3±8.2 Post transplantation -17.1±6.9 Mean difference 0.01±8.6, p=0.99 Change in LV GLS post transplantation in patients with baseline LV dysfunction (%) 0.49±4.3, p=0.63 Change in RV strains post transplantation in patients with baseline RV dysfunction (%) RV GLS 1.78±6.4, p=0.30 RV free wall strain 2.19±8.25, p=0.32 LV and RV strain parameters. Bottom of Form Abstract: P659 Impact of chronic kidney disease on biomarkers predicting severity of coronary artery disease in patients with suspected coronary heart disease: baseline data from the ANOX study Authors: H. Wada1 Organization Kyoto Medical Center - Kyoto - Japan, 2National Hospital On behalf: the ANOX study investigators Topic(s): Risk assessment - Biomarkers Citation: European Heart Journal ( 2017 ) 38 ( Supplement ), 126-127 Funding Acknowledgements: Grant-in-Aid for Clinical Research from the National Hospital Organization Background: The effect of chronic kidney disease (CKD) on biomarkers to predict the presence and severity of coronary artery disease (CAD) are unclear. Methods: The ANOX study is a multicenter, prospective cohort study to determine the predictive value of possible novel biomarkers related to angiogenesis or oxidative stress for major adverse cardiovascular events among patients undergoing elective angiography. Between January 2010 and November 2013, a total of 2,513 patients were enrolled. After excluding 93 patients who were subsequently found ineligible or withdrew consent, the baseline data of 999 CKD patients (63% with CAD, 38% with multi-vessel disease [MVD]) and 1,421 non-CKD patients (54% with CAD, 29% with MVD) were analyzed, respectively. Blood samples were collected from the arterial catheter sheath at the beginning of coronary angiography. The presence of angiographic CAD (=50% stenosis in =1 coronary artery) and its severity were assessed using the Gensini score. Serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGF-C, soluble VEGF receptor-2 (sVEGFR-2), and two oxidatively modified LDLs (a1-antitrypsin/LDL and serum-amyloid-A/LDL [SAA-LDL]), as well as N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), high-sensitivity troponin-I (hsTrop-I), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, were measured. We performed stepwise regression analyses including data on age, sex, the body mass index, systolic blood pressure, LDL- cholesterol, HDL- cholesterol (HDL-C), diabetes, a history of smoking habit, a history of CAD (prior CAD), estimated glomerular filtration rate, antihypertensive drug use, statin use, oral hypoglycemic drug use, insulin use, antiplatelet drug use, and these biomarkers. Results: The presence of CAD was significantly correlated with HDL-C, diabetes, prior CAD, and antiplatelet drug use both in CKD and in non-CKD, sVEGFR-2 in CKD, and age, a male sex, statin use, and natural log-transformed hsTrop-I (Ln-hsTrop-I) in non-CKD. The presence of MVD was significantly correlated with diabetes, prior CAD, antiplatelet drug use, Ln-SAA-LDL and Ln-NT-proBNP both in CKD and in non-CKD, but it was significantly correlated with a male sex and statin use only in non-CKD. After excluding 145 CKD and 309 non-CKD patients with a Gensini score of 0 to obtain a normal distribution, independent determinants of the Ln-Gensini score were diabetes, prior CAD, antiplatelet drug use, and Ln-NT-proBNP both in CKD and in non-CKD, oral hypoglycemic drug use in CKD, and a male sex and HDL-C in non-CKD. Conclusions: Serum levels of hsTrop-I were independently correlated with the presence of CAD in non-CKD, but not in CKD patients. In contrast, those of NT-proBNP and SAA-LDL were independently correlated with severe angiographic CAD both in CKD and non-CKD patients.                       Abstract: P4463 Combination of allogeneic mesenchymal and kidney stem cells promotes kidney repair in chronic kidney disease Authors: A.M. Castellanos1, B.A. Tompkins1, M. Natsumeda1, V. Florea1, J. Rodriguez1, M. Rosado1, W. Balkan1, J. Hare1, I.H. Schulman1, 1University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Institute - Miami - United States of America, Topic(s): Basic Science other Citation: European Heart Journal ( 2017 ) 38 ( Supplement ), 932 Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has a high global prevalence estimated at between 11 to 13%. CKD patients are at significantly increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) with a mortality that is 15 times higher than the general population. Current therapies slow disease progression but do not repair organ damage, ultimately leading to end-stage renal disease. Stem cell therapy has the potential to promote repair via neovascularization and antifibrotic effects. Purpose: We tested the renal regenerative capacity of allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and kidney ckit+ stem cells in an established large animal (swine) model of CKD, the remnant kidney model. Our long-term goal is to identify new therapeutic options for enhancing functional tissue regeneration and preventing the progression of CKD. Methods: Yorkshires pigs (n=27) underwent 5/6 nephrectomy via renal artery embolization using PVA particles and ethanol. At baseline and 4, 8, and 12 weeks post embolization, glomerular filtration rate (GFR), creatinine, BUN, proteinuria, and renal MRI were obtained. Four weeks after embolization, pigs were randomized into 4 groups (n=5 per group): Placebo, MSCs (10×106), c-kit (10×106), and combination group (MSC+c-kit: 1:1 ratio (10×106)). Allogeneic cell therapy was delivered via the patent renal artery of the remnant kidney. At 12 weeks the swine were euthanized. Results: The CKD model was confirmed by an increase in creatinine from baseline of 1.29±0.041mg/dl to 4 weeks post embolization of 2.29±0.157 mg/dl (p<0.0001), increase in BUN (?13.50 mg/dl ± 2.99mg/dl; p=0.0003), decrease in GFR (?49.82±6.41 ml/min; p=0.0002), and increased urine protein/creatinine ratio (?0.311mg/g; p=0.018). Blood pressure was not different between baseline and 4 weeks post embolization between groups. After 12 weeks, the mean arterial pressure showed significant difference between groups (p=0.0418) with an increase predominantly in the placebo group (19.97±8.655 mm/Hg, CI 95% -4.056 to 44.00, p=0.08). BUN and creatinine levels improved in all of the groups, with a slightly greater improvement in the combination group, but not statistically significant (p=0.07). Kidney function measured by glomerular filtration rate had an improvement in all the groups that was greatest in the combination group (76±23.83ml/ min; CI 95% 9.841 to 142.2, p=0.033) from 4 to 12 weeks. Urine protein/creatinine ratio showed an increase in placebo and decrease in cell treated groups, but no significant difference between groups. There was no evidence of immune rejection evaluated in a complete body necropsy. Conclusion: Allogeneic MSCs and kidney-derived stem cells are safe in a CKD swine model. The combination of stem cells was shown to be more efficacious in improving kidney function. These novel findings have important implications for the advancement of cell therapy for CKD.                       Abstract: P3553 Biomarkers of kidney injury, vascular stiffness and kidney fibrosis in gender subgroups of hypertensive patients Authors: S.A. Mironova1, I.S. Iudina1, M.V. Ionov1, T.L. Makhmatova1, N.G. Avdonina1, I.V. Emelyanov1, N.E. Zvartau1, A.O. Konradi1, 1Federal Almazov Medical Research Centre, Cardiology - Saint Petersburg - Russian Federation, Topic(s): Hypertension, other Citation: European Heart Journal ( 2017 ) 38 ( Supplement ), 756 Background: Chronic renal disease and hypertension are strongly associated with vascular damage, increased vascular stiffness and kidney fibrosis resulting in end-stage renal disease. We hypothesized that several novel, potentially more sensitive biomarkers of kidney damage (urine and ultrasound) may be differently related to vascular stiffness and kidney fibrosis in male and female patients with different severity of hypertension. Methods: Urine levels of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), liver fatty-acid binding protein (L-FABP) and serum levels of Cystatin C (sCys) and creatinine (sCr) were measured by quantitative enzyme immunoassay in 92 hypertensive patients, 46 males (mean age 46,3±13,4 years) and 46 females (mean age 55,2±8,9 years). Renal function was analyzed using MDRD and the CKD Epidemiology Collaboration (EPI) sCr equation and CKD-EPI sCys equation. Instrumental examination was performed after 5 days of discontinuation of antihypertensive medications and included Doppler ultrasonography with assessment of intraparenchymal renal arterial resistance indices - RI and PI (Vivid 7 dimension), applanation tonometry (SphygmoCor, Artcor Medical) with the calculation of central aortic pressure, pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AI), and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM, SpaceLabs 90207). Results: Female patients were characterized by higher NGAL (16.6±12.8 versus 6.0±4.3 ng/ml, respectively; p=0.0001) and lower sCys-estimated GFR (88.0±14.1 mL/min/1.73 m2 versus 95.6±19.1; p=0.04), while there were no differences in sCr-estimated GFR, KIM-1, L-FABP and Cystatin C levels. There were also no differences in PWV and ultrasound RI and PI levels between groups. In females novel biomarkers levels were associated with increased arterial stiffness (PWV>10 m/s): sCys-estimated GFR (r=0.351, p=0.02), Cystatin C and L-FABP (r=0.285, p=0.06; r=0.405, p=0.01, respectively). In males patients KIM-1 levels were associated with increased PWV (r=0.612, p=0.06) only in patients with severe and resistant hypertension. In females sCys-estimated GFR associated with PI in right and left arcuate arteries (r=-0,407, p=0,03 and r=-0,419, p=0,03 respectively), RI in right and left intralobular arteries (r=-0,583, p=0,001 and r=-0,556, p=0,001 respectively) and PI in right and left intralobular arteries (r=-0,463, p=0,01 and r=-0,502, p=0,008 respectively), RI in right and left renal arteries (r=-0,502, p=0,004 and r=-0,383, p=0,03 respectively). Conclusions: NGAL and sCys-estimated GFR seem to be potentially earlier and more sensitive biomarkers of kidney injury in hypertensive females, while Cystatin C, L-FABP and intraparenchymal renal arterial resistance indices are linked to increased arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness in males is linked mostly to KIM-1 levels.                       Abstract: P1080 Prevention of contrast-induced nephropathy with single bolus erythropoietin in diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing coronary interventions - a randomized controlled trial Authors: S. Atar1, L. Shema-Didi1, B. Kristal1, 1Western Galilee Hospital - Nahariya - Israel, Topic(s): PCI: procedural complications Citation: European Heart Journal ( 2014 ) 35 ( Abstract Supplement ), 193-194 Purpose: Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is associated with poor outcomes, thus prevention of CIN may be of clinical value. Erythropoietin has been shown to be tissue-protective in experimental models and in few clinical studies of acute kidney injury. We therefore evaluated the effectiveness of a single bolus of erythropoietin for prevention of CIN after coronary angiography (CA) and/or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in consecutive diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease who are at high-risk of developing CIN. Methods: A prospective, randomized, controlled trial was carried out in 120 diabetic patients with eGFR<60 ml/min/1.73m2 who underwent non-urgent CA with or without PCI. Patients received a subcutaneous single dose of 50,000U of erythropoietin or standard preventive protocol (normal saline + N-Acetyl-Cysteine) before CA. CIN was defined as an increase in serum creatinine level, compared to basal value, of at least 0.5 mg/dl during the first 2 days after exposure to contrast media. Primary outcome was the incidence of CIN. Secondary outcomes were the sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) of cystatin C CC) and Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) for diagnosis of CIN. Results: The observed incidence of CIN in our study (6%) was significantly lower than the expected for such high risk population. The administration of EPO prior to CA resulted in a trend (yet non-statistically significant) for reduction in CIN (8.3% vs. 4%, p=0.31). The results were independent of basal kidney function, contrast media type or volume, gender and type of procedure. Cystatin C and NGAL demonstrated a low sensitivity (16.6%) and low PPV (6.7 and 33.3% respectively) for detecting CIN. Conclusion: The administration of a single dose of erythropoietin prior to CA or PCI resulted in trend toward reduction in the incidence of CIN; however, the low incidence of CIN among non-urgent patients in our study probably masked the potential reno-protective effect of erythropoietin.  

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